When we moved in to our new space in Arroyo Seco last October, we set it up so we could have several of our Rio Grande Walking Looms available for classes. We are able to have up to three students at a time, so classes stay small, meaning there is a lot of one-on-one time between the students and the instructor.

Bill's First Weaving

Bill’s First Weaving

In our “Tapestry Weaving on a Walking Loom Class” we start out by tying-up our looms and talking a little about Design and Color.

Bill's Weaving

Bill’s Weaving

Then we jump into Plain Weave and talk about troubleshooting any issues that may arise (curvy edges, bubbly areas, broken warp threads, etc.).

Patsy cutting her weaving off the loom

Patsy cutting her weaving off the loom

Then we begin to weave Vertical Lines, using different types of joints that can be used to create different looks. Then on into Angles and how different types of angles can be used for an endless variety of designs.

Patsy's Tapestry

Patsy’s Tapestry

We also cover some fun design elements such as Pick-n-Pick, Wavy Line, Ojos and Building. Once the weaving is complete and class winds to an end, we cut the tapestry off of the loom and go over finish techniques and a few tricks of the trade.

Sue's Tapestry

Sue’s Tapestry

This class is great for Beginners and those who have never even touched a loom before… all the way to the more Advanced Weaver, who needs a refresher in the Southwestern Style of Tapestry Weaving!

Sue's Weaving

Sue’s Weaving


I just love this piece! I haven’t been able to find the name of it… but I am sure it will turn up eventually. I will make sure to update this when it does.

Handwoven tapestry by Rachel Brown, Circa June 1985

Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, Circa June 1985

These are some of the images from the slides I had scanned recently. A couple of the slides have the date of June 1985 on them. So, I believe my Grandma, Rachel, wove this piece in the spring/summer of ’85.

Tapestry on the Loom in 1985, Woven by Rachel Brown

Tapestry on the Loom in 1985, Woven by Rachel Brown

Above, you can see that she wove this piece on a tapestry loom, using a building technique to create the design. With this technique, she was literally building up (weaving) one shape in the design at a time. This can be an easy way to approach weaving curves.

The Technique of Building Tapestry, Woven by Rachel Brown

The Technique of Building Tapestry, Woven by Rachel Brown

You can see Rachel’s love for light and natural colors in this tapestry.

Detail of Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, 1985

Detail of Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, 1985

This last picture, also from the recently scanned slides, is one of many taken in this space. I think this may have been an artist coop here in Taos back in the 80’s. I will be posting more images of this place and will include the name when I figure it out.

June 1985, Handwoven tapestry by Rachel Brown hanging in a gallery.

June 1985, Handwoven tapestry by Rachel Brown hanging in a gallery.

I hope you find this tapestry as inspiring as I do! Enjoy!


Happy Sunday! Today I am going to share with you part of my Grandma Rachel’s Manta Series.

Blue Lightening, Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, Hand-dyed Wool, 39"x40", 2000

Blue Lightening, Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, Hand-dyed Wool, 39″x40″, 2000

She designed this series to be stunning, yet affordable. You weavers (and probably everyone else) will be able to tell that 2/3’s of each of these weavings has little to no tapestry. The plain weave on either side of the complex center makes these tapestries a lot less work than a weaving that has tapestry throughout. Therefore, the price was very reasonable for a work of art this size. Most pieces in Rachel’s Manta Series are 40”x40”.

Tango in Red, Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, Hand-dyed Wool, 40"x40", 2001

Tango in Red, Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, Hand-dyed Wool, 40″x40″, 2001

With these three tapestries, you can see the stunning effect of the use of only two colors – a saturated base with a “white” accent. However, I don’t believe the “white” is actually white in any of these three tapestries.

Amazing Marigold, Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, Hand-dyed Wool, 40"x40", 2001

Amazing Marigold, Handwoven Tapestry by Rachel Brown, Hand-dyed Wool, 40″x40″, 2001

My Grandma developed a series of dye recipes for our Tapestry Yarn that allows us to get five shades of one color. So, for example, Amazing Marigold was probably woven with our Marigold A and Marigold E Tapestry Yarn. A true white against any one of these colors would probably be almost too much contrast. The tiny bit of dye used in the E’s of each series of our Tapestry Yarns, allows for a “white” color that works well with the other members of that series. Look closely at Tango in Red and Amazing Marigold and you will be able to tell that there is a little bit of color in the “white”.

These are just three of many tapestries in Rachel’s Manta Series. There will be more to come! Enjoy!


A few years ago we had a show at our gallery for my Grandmother, Tapestries of Rachel Brown: A Retrospective. We borrowed pieces from about twenty of her collectors throughout the country and had them hanging for several weeks.

Rachel Brown and Her Family during the Opening of Rachel Brown: A Retrospective

Rachel Brown and Her Family during the Opening of Rachel Brown: A Retrospective

I remember opening the first package we received with one of her tapestries rolled up inside. I hadn’t seen her work in person in several years. We were all amazed at the beauty and the quality of the weaving when we unrolled it. Over the span of about a month, several packages like this arrived at the shop. Each one was as exciting to open as the first!

Many of Rachel’s collectors in New Mexico invited us to see her work hanging in their homes. Each person shared beautiful and amazing stories with us about how they came to own their Rachel Brown tapestry.

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

We had a fantastic opening! People from all over New Mexico and the rest of the country came to see Rachel and show their love for her and her work. These photos were all taken during the opening (by Kathleen Brennan).

Seeing all of these tapestries in one place together was truly inspiring!

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

After my Grandma passed, I inherited thousands of her slides. A few weeks ago I decided to go through a few boxes and came across a collection of images of her tapestries. They were so beautiful! I spent hours sifting through everything and realized there were hundreds of slides, and most of the pieces I had never seen before. I was so inspired! I decided I needed to get back to the loom as soon as possible.

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

The feelings of inspiration that stirred inside me during my Grandma’s Retrospective and when I came across all these slides need to be shared! So, I sent the slides to be scanned…

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

Tapestries of Rachel Brown

I will be posting all the images here on our blog over the next year as inspiration for you! Some of the images are high quality and have been “cleaned up”, while others are old slides that have faded slightly over the years or are snapshots Rachel took of her process while the piece was on the loom.

I hope these inspire you and encourage you to get back to the loom… or learn to weave… or pick up a paintbrush… or just make you smile. Enjoy!