Thanks to the wonderful community of Arroyo Seco and The Arroyo Seco Mercantile we have been able to show everyone a bit of what happens behind the scenes at Weaving Southwest. Directly across the road from our shop, in the heart of Arroyo Seco, we have been demonstrating our dyeing techniques… turning our beautiful natural yarns into a variety of stunning, mouthwatering colors! We will be doing this a few more times this fall… click here to see the schedule. Below is a series of photos of our days so far, Dyeing in the Road. Enjoy!

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Cleaning the pots for our big day.

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The beautiful gardens across from our shop in Arroyo Seco.

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Setting up the dye studio across from our shop.

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The natural yarns ready to be dyed.

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The dye pots heating up.

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Preparing the yarn for the dye.

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Our first color… Marigold!

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Our wonderful set-up in the center of Seco.

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Pulling down the yarns for Round Two.

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Getting ready to soak the next batch, while Round One cools.

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Adding the dye…

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Giving the pots a stir…

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Blue Electra is ready, as the water is clear…

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Blue Electra fresh out of the pot.

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Explaining the dye process, while adding a new batch of yarn.

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Clearing the pots with some Mop-Up.

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Rinsing and talking about yarn…

Coming to the end of a day of Dyeing in the Road.

Coming to the end of a day of Dyeing in the Road.

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The view from the Seco gardens, looking towards our shop.

    A days work, drying in the sun.

A days work, drying in the sun.

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You know its been a great day when this is your view!

We hope you liked the photos! We would love to hear what you think! Do you dye? Natural Pigments or Acid Dyes? Is this something you have always wanted to learn? Do you have a favorite blog that is all about dyeing? We would love to hear from you! Leave a comment in the comment section to share your thoughts. Thank you!

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I had a beautiful morning at the Dye Studio today! The snow was melting, the birds were chirping and each color seemed to brighten up the February landscape just a little bit more…

Dripping wet Ivory Rug Yarn

Dripping wet Ivory Rug Yarn

Persian Lilac B, 2-ply Tapestry, Yarn fresh out of the dyepots

Persian Lilac B, 2-ply Tapestry, Yarn fresh out of the dyepots

A beautifully rich dyelot of Caramel C, 2-ply Tapestry Yarn

A beautifully rich dyelot of Caramel C, 2-ply Tapestry Yarn

Pinon C, 2-ply Tapestry Yarn, ready to be rinsed

Pinon C, 2-ply Tapestry Yarn, ready to be rinsed

2-ply Tapestry Yarn (Persian Lilac B, Caramel D & E) drying in the New Mexico sun

2-ply Tapestry Yarn (Persian Lilac B, Caramel D & E) drying in the New Mexico sun

Pinon D & E, 2-ply Tapestry Yarn drying in the sun

Pinon D & E, 2-ply Tapestry Yarn drying in the sun


We just received a huge shipment of our beautiful, custom spun Rug Yarn! And we are so excited to get to the dyepots again!

Our Beautiful Dye Studio in Arroyo Seco, NM

Our Beautiful Dye Studio in Arroyo Seco, NM

We use a method of dyeing developed by Rachel Brown, founder of Weaving Southwest/Rio Grande Weavers Supply, that is unique and very environmentally conscious. We call it the “sequential” method of dyeing. Since with acid dyes the water is clear when the dyeing is complete, the same hot acidic water can be used over and over again, saving on water, fuel and acid.

First in the pots are some of our lighter colors: Straw, Wheat, Ivory and Beige.

Straw Rug Yarn being stirred in our large outdoor pots.

Straw Rug Yarn being stirred in our large outdoor pots.

Once they are out of the pots we hang them to dry in the warm New Mexico sun.

Straw and Ivory Rug Yarn drying in the sun.

Straw and Ivory Rug Yarn drying in the sun.

Then on to slightly darker colors: El Topo, Pewter, Walnut and Oak.

Taking a look at the Oak Rug Yarn to see if all the color has set.

Taking a look at the Oak Rug Yarn to see if all the color has set.

We are so grateful for the New Mexico monsoon season!

Checking the Ivory Rug Yarn in the monsoonal rains.

Checking the Ivory Rug Yarn in the monsoonal rains.

Because of all of the rains these last couple weeks, we are able to use our large wood burning pots.

A freshly stoked fire under our largest dye pot.

A freshly stoked fire under our largest dye pot.

This allows us to easily dye our darker colors like Pumpkin.

Pumpkin Rug Yarn in our large wood burning pot.

Pumpkin Rug Yarn in our large wood burning pot.

We have several hundred pounds of yarn to dye, so we will be at it for several weeks! We are also going to be dyeing some of our 2-Ply Tapestry Yarn and a new yarn that we just LOVE (and can’t wait to share)!


This morning was spent in Arroyo Seco at our dye studio so I could collect random items for our shop displays and also show you Teresa’s beautiful dye process.

So Teresa is the girl on the left and her ma, Lorelei, on the right

First the yarn is counted out into how many skeins are needed in a particular colour

Then its soaked in the fire-heated water for a wee bit

Chupa, is very meticulous about measuring out the correct amounts of dye…

The time the yarn spends in the dyepot depends on how dark the colour will be, our cloud for instance only takes around 10 minutes, whereas the black is left overnight.

After its allocated time, the yarn is pulled out and left to dry,

and voila!

-Hannah