Handwoven rug, Weaving Southwest Designs, hand-dyed wool

This is another piece from our “archives”. You can see more from this series by clicking here, herehere, and here.

This may have been one of the first versions of our Raindance pattern. You can click here to see some of the more recent variations on this design.

Enjoy!

Ciao,
Teresa


Handwoven rug, Weaving Southwest Designs, hand-dyed wool

This is another piece from our “archives”. You can see more from this series by clicking here, here, and here.

This may have been one of the first versions of our Meander pattern. You can click here to see some of the more recent variations on this design.

Enjoy!

Ciao,
Teresa


Handwoven rug, Weaving Southwest Designs, hand-dyed wool

This is another piece from our “archives”. You can see more from this series by clicking here  and here.

This may have been one of the first variations of our Moki Zig-Zag pattern. You can click here to see some of the more recent variations on this design.

Enjoy!


Handwoven rug, Weaving Southwest Designs, hand-dyed wool

Here is another piece from our “archives”… this was one of the first of our Sheaves of Wheat design. You can click here to see some other variations on this design.

And you can click here to see another piece from our archives.

Enjoy!


Handwoven rug, Weaving Southwest Designs, hand-dyed wool

 

We are finally getting back on track here after the holiday break with our daughter. 🙂

And with that, we want to share some of our inspiration with you!

Whenever we are designing a new rug for the shop, we pull out our “archives”… a huge blue binder full of photos, sketches, and notes from the last 30+ years of weaving here at Weaving Southwest.

Not only are these designs some of Rachel Brown’s, but also the weavers we have had over the years, including Kimberly Hamill, Margaret Hermann, Roxanne Rane and Jodi Tucker (to name a few). Many of these designs have been woven over and over, incorporating different colors and playing around with different aspects of the design.

The images aren’t the best, as they are photos of photos (taken up to 30 years ago) and for most pieces, we don’t know the original sizes.

But, we thought you might like to see a glimpse into what happens behind the scenes here… and maybe these will add some inspiration to your next piece! 🙂

Enjoy!


The wolf in front of the sheepfold, by Hélène Crié-Wiesner, 48″ x 44″ (96 cm x 112 cm), Hand-dyed wool weft (from Weaving Southwest), cotton warp (the image comes from a bestiary of the 12th century)

I am so excited to share this piece with you!

Over the years, Hélène has become one of my favorite tapestry artists… and she uses our yarns!

Maybe it’s the images she weaves. Maybe it’s her color choices. Maybe it is because I got to know her and her approach to her style of weaving when she was in one of my classes (that was a bit intimidating, teaching a certified French tapestry weaver Southwestern-style techniques, lol, but we had a wonderful time!). But, there is something about her work that sticks with me.

Every time she emails me a picture of a finished piece I am, well, blown away! And, for some reason, for months following, images of her work just keep popping into my mind. 🙂

I hope you enjoy this piece as much as I do. I’m going to try to dig up a few more photos of her work to share with you soon.

The image for this piece comes from a bestiary of the 12th century.

You can find Hélène on Facebook by clicking here.

Enjoy!


Handwoven tri-panel rug by Teresa Loveless, 84″ x 108″, hand-dyed wool on wool warp

We missed a couple Doses this week. Sorry about that! Our kiddo has a school break and has kinda consumed all our time. 🙂

This piece is the last I am going to share from this series (I don’t have good photos of the rest). You can click hereherehere and here to see more from this series.

This was the largest of them all! And quite a challenge as I had loom issues for the center panel and then needed to match up the ojos in the outer panels to the stripes in the center panel. Honestly, I didn’t think it was going to work… but it did! I trusted my math and, for the most part, it worked out!

You will notice a little bit of puckering in the center panel (this is because of the loom issues). The client didn’t mind and just wanted this piece right away. We hope the rug “settles into itself”, as pieces tend to once they are off the loom for a bit. But, if not, I will be blocking it someday soon to get rid of the puckers (as the weaver, they drive me crazy, lol, but the clients didn’t mind at all!).

I hope you have a wonderful day filled with family and friends!

Enjoy!